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new questions about the war in afghanistan and whether a key u.s. ally is helping the enemy. i'm katie couric. also tonight an exclusive cbs news interview with the president of iran. mahmoud ahmadinejad denies he's aiding the taliban and accuses president obama of snubbing him. a shake-up is expected to put an american in charge of b.p. while tony heyward could walk away with an ocean of severance pay. and steve hartman takes the temperature of the nation and finds we're running hot. >> i wish it were winter. >> reporter: and cold. >> i love the heat. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. the obama administration is dealing with a serious breach of national security tonight. tens of thousands of classified documents about the war in afghanistan leaked and posted on the web. at a time when more than 60% of americans believe the war is not going well, the documents provide some evidence to back that up. more than 91,000 were leaked to wikileaks dot-org which put 76,00
. >> reporter: the avalanche of documents, most of them classified secret, shows how the u.s. has been losing the war in afghanistan one day at a time. >> the real story of this material is that it's war. it's one damned thing after another. >> reporter: julian assange the head of wikileaks which posted the documents on the web hopes researchers will mine them for a real picture of the war. this new trove covers six years of war in afghanistan through kind of reports both accurate and inaccurate every commander receives at his morning briefing. >> small arms fire and rpg. >> reporter: for instance, this report of the first use of the heat-seeking surface-to- air missile against an american aircraft. a weapon that would cripple u.s. air power if the taliban ever got them in large numbers. most of the reports document what is already well known. for years the u.s. has not had enough troops in afghanistan. resulting in this record of a remote outpost calling for help as they are nearly overrun. we are taking casualties. enemy in the wild. the afghan government has been corrupt and inefficient. a
. some of the documents ripped the cover off the u.s.-led war effort in afghanistan. they tell a story that some veterans of the region know full well. more civilian deaths than are ever reported, unexplained american deaths, questionable battlefield tactics and a mission just not going that well. this comes just as the u.s., of course, is gearing up this new push in the conflict. we have two reports to start off with tonight. first, our pentagon correspondent jim miklaszewski. jim, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, brian. this massive leak provides incredible detail and insight into the u.s. war in afghanistan. day by day, battle by battle it's a tough look at the worst of the war. the staggering mountain of documents, nearly 92,000, covers a six-year stretch of the war ending last december when the u.s. war effort was failing and the taliban was on the rise. the secret documents were released by the whistleblower website wikileaks and its founder, julian assange. >> the real story of this material is that it's war. it's one damn thing after another. it is the continuous small
to get physical with the u.s. over sanctions. there is a rosy picture of economic progress but are they looking at rose-colored glasses? and some climb on board to extend bush era tax cuts. live from the studio in washington, this is "special report". good evening. i'm bret baier. pentagon officials say they plan to conduct military exercises with south korea despite a threat from the north of what it calls a physical response. the drills and the north's reaction to them, both grow out of accusations that north korea was responsible for the sinking of a south korean warship in march. tensions are rising tonight. national correspondent steve centanni has the story from the pentagon. >> reporter: with military hardware in place for a pointed show of force off the kore korean peninsula, harsh words remain the weapon of choice. at asian security conference in hanoi, vietnam, they condemned the military exercises and issued this threat -- >> it will be physical, respon response. it's no longer the 19th century, which -- [inaudible ] >> but the diplomacy it is. the exercises incl
cooperating with the taliban. documents show u.s. special opposite forces targeted militants without trial. records detail multiple civilian deaths at the hand of coalition troops that were previously unreported. the wikileaks honcho charged the documents appear to indicate war crimes. >> it's clear it will shape an understanding of what the past six years of war has been like and the course of the war needs to be changed. >> the white house, great britain's government and pakistan have condemned the released of those classified documents. afghan government says it's shocked, but the information is mostly old. nbc news national investigative correspondent michael isikoff joins me now. what is most damaging to the american administration's in terms of these released documents? >> i think the details about the pakistani intelligence services cooperation with elements of the taliban and the hakani it in work. these are enemies of the united states and afghanistan, enemies of the cia. we've been trying to kill these people. what the documents show, reflects long-standing concerns by many eleme
and just met with general petraeus and other members in the area of kabul. this is very odd for two u.s. service members to go missing and in fact for them to just leave their base in kabul in a separate vehicle without other vehicles following them. many of us trying to figure out answers to these questions that baffled many within the material as well as journalists and as well as the civilian community. >> two soldiers left their base and went missing, and now government officials telling us one is dead and the other is being held by the taliban. atia, a lot of people might be wondering about the other five? there was a separate incident where five were killed. you also spoke about a taliban spokesperson calling you. that might sound strange to some people here in the u.s., but i want you to address the fact that the taliban, that the u.s. fighting there and does have a heck of a pr infrastructure there, and if can you address that for the viewers, and do we note condition of the second soldier now being held? >> reporter: well, when we talk about the condition of the second soldier,
is your "situation room." >>> happy birthday, rick. happening now, the u.s. economy loses jobs for the first time this year. the president insists that the recovery is moving forward but americans who are desperate for a paycheck may not be buying that. and two more alleged russian spies reveal their true identities. we'll look at the perils of being a secret agent with kids. and we'll hear from the grown son of one of the suspects. >>> and a leading conservative is calling on the republican party chairman to do his patriotic duty this july 4th by resigning. how long can michael steele hang on to his job? wolf blitzer is off today. i'm suzanne malveaux and you're in "the situation room." >>> well job gains in america hit a wall now adding to fears that the nation may be socked with a second recession. there are new figures that show that the economy lost 125,000 jobs in june. now you can see there had been job growth every month in 2010 until the june slide. the loss is mostly due to the fact that the census is over and those jobs related to the census went away. the overall un
the u.s. intelligence community almost a decade after 9/11. and is the tea party movement being torn apart by allegations of racism? one wing of the group expels another and tea party backed candidates are left holding the bag. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in the situation room. >>> right now officials in the gulf say they don't see any major red flags with the new well cap that might force them to unleash a big gusher of oil. once again they're moving ahead with another full day of tests, athoer 24 hours. they are keeping a close watch on pressure levels. all important pressure levels. and any existing or potential oil leaks. david mattingly is looking at all of this in new orleans on the scene. you just heard from thad allen, the incident commander, and update our viewers on what we know right now, david. >> reporter: wolf, thad allen says they're looking at anomalies that they're encountering down there but so far none of them indicating a problem that tells them they have to stop these tests and reopen that well. but these anomalies as he discussed them were happening as methane comi
. well, matt, as you know, the high octane british prime minister, david cameron, arrived for his first u.s. visit since taking office in early may. and we had a chance to interview him. cameron and obama, both in their 40s, both with young children. but cameron is a conservative, and on this day, we learned bp is selling $7 billion in assets to another oil company, the apache corporation, to generate cash for the costs of the oil spill. cameron had been worried that unrelenting u.s. pressure on the company could affect the stockholders on both sides of the ocean. are you as angry about what happened in the gulf as americans are? >> yes, i was very angry about it because anyone who cares about the environment, when you see those pictures of oil pouring out of an underground well and doing so much environmental damage, doing damage to wildlife, to beaches, that makes you angry, that makes you angry. i want bp to sort it out. i do think it's in britain's interest and also america's interest, and the world's interest, that bp remains a strong and stable company, not only so it is able to make
using shoulder-fired heat-seeking missiles to shoot down u.s. helicopters and other air crafts. these missiles helped afghan guerillas defeat the soviet occupation in the 19el 80s. there were a huge number of civilians caught in the cross fire in land and air operations and also seek let u.s. commando raids against taliban leaders, some successful, others resulting in civilian deaths. >>> again, one of the most devastating points in these documents is the allegation that pakistan's spy agency is supplying weapons, training and even planning some operations for the afghan taliban. now, on friday, i spoke with matt waldman, this is before these wikileaks were made. matt waldman is an independent analyst who, through his own research, has come to the same conclusion about pakistan's intelligence agency, helping the taliban. he has visited afghanistan numerous times, and interviewed taliban field commanders, taliban officials, foreign diplomats, and other analysts. here's part of what he told us. >> well, this is research that we conducted over six months, and as you say, we interv
right. mike viqueira on the white house lawn, thanks very much. >>> new reports of just how much the u.s. paid that iranian scientist for secrets of iran's nuclear program. jim miklaszewski joins us from the pentagon. mick, the numbers are staggering. the cia paid $5 million and one report said offered him $50 million to not return to iran. do we know how true the report is? >> reporter: the claim from the iranian nuclear scientist himself and no basis to that fact but u.s. officials confirm that the cia paid this nuclear scientist $5 million after the scientist defected to the united states but he's now returning to teheran. good news here according to u.s. officials is this person cannot get the hands on that money. he returned to teheran overnight a hero's welcome and reunion with his wife and son who may have been in danger back there in iran but the money is in frozen accounts controlled by the u.s. government for the time being. one of the big questions here, chuck, is once sanctions if they're ever lifted on iran would he then have the ability to get at that $5 million? but there'
of the fund gave some of the money to groups promoting the bill. it's illegal under the u.s. la for the government to lobby for or against abortion in foreign countries. >> back here at home, the spokesman confirmed that the new federal regulations will require healthcare providers to have technology enabling them to calculate a person body mass index. which is used to determine obesity. b.m.i. is a relationship between height and weight and the stimulus package requires providers to have the height and weight information stored electronically and available on new exchange. new test results are in for the temporary fix of the well cap in the gulf. officials say it's good news, worries still persist over potential leaks. correspondent william la jeunesse is here with an update. good evening. >> since capping the well, they expected increase in pressure from methane. they expected the 2500 pounds per square inch, they got 6700. so while there is no evidence of a leak, there is ambiguity of the finding. what does it mean for the gulf? more uncertainty. >> until it's stopped permane
each other about a ra barack and david. >> the u.s. has no stronger partner than great britain. >> reporter: but the bp oil leak in the gulf coast test thad alliance. oil giant british petroleum continues to wreak of havoc. >> i completely understand the anger that exists. the oil spill a catastrophe. >> reporter: and growing controversy whether bp had the role in a release of ali muhammad. >> releasing a mass murderer of 270 people, the largest act of terrorism ever committed in the united kingdom, was completely wrong. so in my view, neither should that killer have been given that luxury. that wasn't a decision taken by bp. it was taken by the scottish government. >> reporter: he was convicted in the 1988 pan am 103 bombing over lockerbie scotland that killed 270 people, mostly americans. the scottish government released him on compassionate grounds after doctors said he had terminal prostate cancer and just three months to live. president obama said that was a mistake, and cameron agreed. cameron said he would provide information for a u.s. congressional investigation but di
of some very valuable time. >> well, the war games resume. the u.s. have south korea conducting a second day of joint exercises off the korean peninsula, maneuvers involving 8,000 personnel. these are in response to the sinking of a ship in march of north korea has threatened a nuclear response. >>> the man that published leaked documents says there's evidence of war crimes. atika shubert looks at what's on the website. >> reporter: wikileaks is publishing what it says is more than 90,000 u.s. military reports filed about the war in afghanistan from 2006 to 2008. raw data from the front line, a day by day unvarnished view of the war by u.s. soldiers themselves. wikileaks will not say how it received the documents and cnn has not been able to independently confirm their authenticity but if confirmed, it would be the biggest leak yet of classified documents to wikileaks. >>> irresponsible is the word used by national security of course general james jones to describe the release of the documents. let's bring in barbara starr. what should we make of these documents? do they paint a comprehe
before the race. >> not even close. >>> on the broadcast tonight, the slowdown. news tonight about the u.s. economy, jobs, housing, stocks and what many hoped would be a rebound. >>> the spies who lived quiet lives in america were working for russians. tonight, a stunning admission. >>> the struggle in the gulf. stormy weather slows the cleanup but doesn't stop people making a difference for friends and neighbors. >>> and the secret. how do some people make it to 100? how do some people make it to 100? "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> announcer: from nbc news world headquarters in new york, this is nbc "nightly news" with brian williams. >>> good evening. i'm ann curry in for brian williams. new signs tonight the economy is slowing down. from a jump in unemployment benefits to a record low number of home sales to slowdowns in manufacturing, construction and auto sales, it's all pointing to an economy that looks less healthy than it did a few weeks ago. and that was reflected in the stock market today. the dow closed down another 41 points standin
somebody with a vice president would be arriving with their wife. perhaps an an indication on the u.s. perspective on the war. the biden's did attend several ceremonies, like a naturalization ceremony, and that was noted by the vice president that also congratulated the troops and said he had seen many signs of progress to include that he saw a traffic jam, and that was a wonderful thing. here is where we get into the issue of just how much the u.s. and iraqi perspective does differ. the traffic jam are a direct cause from check points, and there are huge areas of the city that are blocked bye-b blast wa. he will meet with senior iraqi officials as well as the political leadership. the government still has to be formed and political leaders have been at an impasse, especially when it comes to who the country's next president should be. >> again, on this interesting part of the story, to seat vice president's wife is along with him on this trip, and she had her own schedule. >> reporter: that's right. she does. she did join him in visiting the troops on the fourth of july, but she is a
else, the largest leak of wartime documents in this country since the vietnam war. more than 90,000 u.s. government documents obtained and posted by the website wikileaks over the weekend. the last time there was a leak of this volume, it precipitated a full-on war between the "new york times" and the nixon white house. it was, of course, the leaking of the pentagon papers during the vietnam war by u.s. military analyst named daniel elsburg back in 1971. the pentagon papers was a touch stone that helped turn the public against vietnam war. the 90,000 plus documents posted by kwikileaks are different than the pentagon papers in that they're snap shots of the war over the last six years, as opposed a top-down study initiated in washington. the wikileaks documents are raw intelligence, threat analysis as seen through the eyes of the soldier fighting the war. as opposed an analytical view of the war from policymakers. in that sense wikileaks is no pentagon papers, but there is a glaring pair lil lel between the two that can't be ignored. these wikileaks documents have been notable in that t
are killing u.s. troops in afghanistan. >> plus, what secretary clinton says about the hunt for osama bin laden, the lockerbie bomber and chelsea clinton's fast approaching wedding. good afternoon. i'm savannah guthrie in for andrea mitchell, and we'll begin with that fresh new look and size and scope of america's counterterrorism efforts, an effort that's grown so much, so fast, that it may actually be making it tougher to stop threats to the u.s. with me now nbc's justice correspondent pete williams who has been poring over this reporting coming out of the "washington post." pete, to you. what is the main headline here? what really caught your eye? >> what "the post" is saying that it's grown so fast without any careful design, just sort of adding new things on, that it's so big nobody really knows how big it is, and it's so big that there are overlapping areas where the intelligence community is doing things where other people doing those things don't necessarily know. >> it's like urban sprawl from a legislative standpoint. >> exactly. >> and they say it's nationwide. it's operating t
-- roman polanski will not be extradited to the united. the swiss justice ministry says u.s. officials failed to provide all of the records needed for the transfer. polanski has been on the run from the united states since 1978 when he pleaded guilty to child sex charges. criminal defense attorney paul callan reacted to the news this morning. >> the extradition law is if the crime is a crime in the country where the person is being held, switzerland, in the same place the crime was committed, california, and this was rape, extradition will occur. switzerland is not to be looking at the underlying strength of the case, and polanski pled guilty here, so it is shocking that the swiss are not extraditing. >>> well, members of congress return to work today with an ambitious to-do list, financial reform, a supreme court nomination, whether to extend unemployment benefits. what makes it more challenging is the time line. they have about a month until their next recess. what do you think they should make their top priority? join of conversation with us at cnn.com/tony. we will share some of th
for now, the big telethon, individuals in the u.s. meanwhile have pledged around $1.3 billion. you see the numbers, how much has been pledged and actually how much has been handed over and delivered there. a lot of aid has made it to haiti but 1.5 million people still homeless. some of the people in need the most or in need of most are falling through the cracks. that's the case at one orphanage it was visited by our dr. sanjay gupta. ♪ >> reporter: it is so striking in orphanages, smiles amid squalor. 350,000 orphans in haiti. best guess. many, like this little guy, don't even have a name. don't know how old he is. he's an orphan in this orphanage. among lots of other children. 40 to 50 at any given time. that's how many kids are taken care of. let me show you something else as well. look at this particular building. you just look at the floor over here. that's where they sleep. there are no bedrooms. find a place and sleep for the night. this is the kitchen. for all those children. this pot of beans is their food for the entire day. simply not enough. you take a look. they have to
, the first one is a phoenix police officer whose name is david salgado, a native-born u.s. citizen of mexican ancestry. his opposition to sb 1070 is based on several broad constitutional arguments. one is that the law violates the 14th amendment, which guarantees minorities full rights as u.s. citizens. the other claim is that the law conflicts with what's known as the supremacy clause of the constitution. he argue sths that it gives the federal government, not state and local police forces authority over immigration laws. he also says that the law is having a chilling effect on his first amendment rights to speak out against it. tj? >> well, casey, what does, i guess this also has to be kind of torn. because this is an officer of the law who wants to uphold the law, of course, but he's been asked to uphold a law that he doesn't quite frankly believe in. >> right, and officer salgado said he's in a dilemma and plans to not enforce the law because he believes it's unconstitutional. here's the dilemma, he said that could subject him to discipline from his employer, the phoenix police department
in the u.s. is it global warming? >>> and, want to win? a sharp shooter takes on a carnival game at the state fair. >>> good evening. arizona's immigration law is on hold. the protests are not. emboldened by a judge's rebuke of that law yesterday, hundreds of opponents of the crackdown took to the streets today. but the state's unyielding governor stood by the law and filed an appeal. barbara pinto is in phoenix tonight. she's been there all day, in the middle of the stormy showdown. >> reporter: protestors descended on phoenix, despite a judge's ruling to delay enforcement of most of the state's new crackdown on illegal immigrants. demonstrations started at dawn, hundreds of protesters, dozens of arrests, tempering flaring. tensions are running high outside this jail, where protesters have gathered and it's turned into a standoff, police trying to push their way out of the building. demonstrations were loud, disruptive, but mostly peaceful. >> joe arpaio has picked the easy targets, the day laborers. let's go after the real criminals and stop wasting our money. >> reporter: this
laying in repose, the u.s. senator byrd's casket was moved to west virginia's capitol in charleston for the service. public viewing ends at 9:00 this morning and the memorial is at 11:30. byrd served longer and cast more votes than any other senator in u.s. history. those are your headlines. >> all right. let's talk about the big story this weekend which is, of course, the immigration situation and the president's speech on thursday. it was a big speech. all eyes on the president. a lot of rhetoric. it was almost poetic but we also sit here this morning and we ask what did we accomplish? why did he give this speech at this time, guys? still no policy. a lot of politics involved but still no policy, still no bill floated from the president. there's nothing going through the house or the senate. yet, he's pointing the finger at the republicans. >> governor jan brewer was on greta last night and she said she wanted specifics and wanted to see some sort of legislation. take a listen. >> let's be practical. if your house is burning down, you put out the fire and call the architect to se
in the u.s. this morning, the president making his case for a way forward. >>> a former vice president, a masseuse, and a sex assault case reopened. what happened in portland? al gore's people speaking out. >>> we begin with those heavy rains and tornadoes that are pounding south texas as hurricane alex comes ashore. the season's first hurricane actually made landfall in northeastern mexico with 100-mile-an-hour winds. alex has weakened and it moved inland. it is now a tropical storm. still has the potential to trigger flash floods and mud slides. alex is having an impact on the oil spill cleanup hundreds of miles away. aftereffects of the storm could keep the skimming operation from resuming until this weekend. south padre island, texas, escaped the brunt of the storm but took a big hit. reynolds wolf is there. reynolds? >> reporter: what we have here is still plenty of wind, rain for the most part is gone. the waves continue to rock against the shores. some of these things have been monsters that have been coming along the coast here. the beach which used to stretch out towards the h
are looking at the u.s. coast e coast guard "resolute." that was our ride out here. it took us overnight from pensacola. now we arrived at our destination behind us here is the very spot where the deepwater horizon rig caught fire, sank to the bottom of the ocean and started that huge environmental and economic disaster. and this is a critical time. one mile beneath my feet testing is under way that could lead to capping the well. these images of the oil spewing into the gulf may soon be just a bad memory. but you wouldn't know it by what you see on the surface. quick observations of what we see out here. it looks like a small city of vessels. about 10, 20 large ships out there, two of them clearly producing oil. pumping it up from below. that's where we see the large flames erupting after they burn off the natural gas that comes up. i asked our coast guard escort to go in for a closer look. i wanted to see if there was anything going on that might show this catastrophe is turning a corner. this is as close as we could go. we are a mile away. why can't we get any closer? >> safety is paramoun
was in pakistan today, emphasizing the u.s. commitment there. she announced several new projects as part of a $7.5 billion aid effort. she then travelled to kabul for international security conference on the afghanistan war. before leaving pakistan, clinton talked to greta van susteren and she thinks, clinton thinks someone in that government of pakistan knows where osama bin laden is. >> if there were a terrorist network operating somewhere, even in the remote place in the united states, some sheriff, you know, some local state policeman, somebody in our collective government would probably know that there was something suspicious going on. so that's why i assume somebody, somebody in this government from top to bottom does know where bin laden is. i'd like to know, too. >> bret: tune in, 10:00 p.m. eastern time for on the record with greta to see her exclusive interview with secretary clinton. security in afghanistan has been heightened in advance of the security conference mrs. clinton is attending. thousands of soldiers and police have been deployed to kabul. two u.s. soldiers were killed by
copia county. >>> a milestone in the afghan war. july now the deadliest month in the war for u.s. troops. more people are asking, is this fight worth the cost? >>> and we are coming back. that is president obama's message for the auto industry. we're tracking his trip aimed at boosting the big three. >>> but first, you have got to see this. this is one congressman saying he's not taking it anymore. here is what he said. anthony weiner, congressman of new york said today, maybe the brooklyn in me came out. he's referring to what happened last night on the flash of the house of representatives after a bill that he co sponsored didn't make it for procedural reasons. listen to him in his own words. >> the gentleman from new york is recognized. >> mr. speaker, i yield one minute to the distinguished gentleman from new york, mr. weiner. >> great courage, to wait until all members have already spoken and then stand up and wrap your arms around procedure. we see it in the united states' senate every day where members say we want amendments, we want debate, but we're still a no. and then we stand
reform. >> bottom line is it is a lot more difficult to get across the u.s. mexican bord near the u.s. illegally than it used to be. >> a president obama makes the case to overhaul the country's immigration laws. his address in minutes, comes just weeks before arizona's tough new immigration law takes effect. . >>> images of sticky, smelly oil. our guests tell us how the bp disaster put a dent in their tourist-based businesses. good morning, everyone. i'm tony harris, those stories and your comments right here, right now in the "cnn newsroom." >>> reformer in chief, president obama is set to lay out his vision for overhauling immigration laws. the president will deliver his first policy address on this very polarizing issue minutes are from now at american university school of international service in washington. let's do this. let's get to our senior congressional correspondent dana bash on capitol hill for us. and, dana, look, the president is about to open a conversation here in minutes, but is that conversation likely to lead to a new proposal of a new bill, of new law? >> reporte
passing the u.s. senate. reform is now on its way to president obama's desk where it will be signed into law sometime next week. all but three republicans in the senate voted against it. surveying that political landscape together, this was the takeaway from the top republican in the senate, mitch mcconnell. >> we broke out of the washington echo chamber and fought the government-driven solutions democrats were proposing. in short, you might say we got our groove back. >> disturbing as it is to imagine mitch mcconnell grooving in any way, consider what he sees as his party's groove. two years after the worst economic meltdown since the great depression, thanks to wall street, today, the republicans have decided that we shouldn't reform wall street, that everything's fine as it is. it's in the senate where republicans just voted against wall street reform. >> the rest of the groove is as amazing as their stance on wall street. their "bring back bush" tax agenda slated to add $3.5 trillion to the deficit. they are still opposing unemployment benefits. to be clear, that's the republica
troubles for the ranks of the u.s. army. we begin with our pentagon correspondent jim miklaszewski. good evening. >> reporter: good evening. the army promises to fix its mental health problems and put its soldiers first, but it's got a long way to go. as a specialist in the army jennifer crane was sent off to afghanistan. >> two weeks after we landed there, we were attacked for the first time. >> reporter: the war took a heavy personal toll. at home she got hooked on cocaine and ended up on the streets. >> unfortunately, didn't cope with anything very well. >> reporter: jennifer got the necessary counseling and is back on her feet, but a devastating new report from the army today reveals that after nine years of war, thousands of soldiers never survive their own personal battles. >> we have an army that's been fully engaged for almost nine years now. i don't think that we fully understand the toll that that's taken on the forces. >> reporter: the numbers are staggering. last year, more than 1,700 soldiers attempted suicide. 160 succeeded. the highest number in 30 years. and drug abuse is
polanski will be extradited to the u.s. to face child sex charges. polanski pleaded guilty to having sex with a 13-year-old girl back in 1977. he then fled to europe before sentencing. we are expected to learn more about this decision in about two hours. we'll bring that to you live right here on the most news in the morning. >>> the white house this morning promising the terrorist behind the "deplorable and cowardly attacks" in euganda will be tracked down and brought to justice. at least 64 people were killed including one american. six americans from a church mission were also injured. joining me on the phone right now, cnn national security contributor fran townsend. fran was the homeland security advisor to president bush and is now a member of the cia's external advisory board. we're talking about these crowded venues. people gathered to watch the world cup of course finals, one was a restaurant there, a popular restaurant. do we know who could have been the target of these blasts? >> that's the ultimate question. i think when you see the white house statement that you referred to,
with the blood of americans. let me explain. july is officially the deadliest month for u.s. forces in nine long years of the war with 66 americans killed. the danger and the volatility aren't limited to the battle field. there are scores of people who riot in the afghan capital today after a vehicle carrying four u.s. contractors was involved in an accident with a car carrying four afghans. our cnn reporter ness kabul. >> reporter: around 3:00 p.m. friday afternoon and here in the capital of kabul, on airport road, this road is called airport road, two american vehicles were driving when one hit a civilian vehicle in the end killing two adults, one man, one woman, and injuring four others. this is the remains of the first car. this is apparently the car that actually hit the civilian vehicle. if you notice they were trying to leave after being attacked by other civilians in the area. while they tried to leave their car got stuck here on this side of the curb. and if we walk here we can show you the rocks thrown by the afghans in the area who saw everything happen. it was an angry mob. over a th
last week, hillary clinton called pakistan a partner. the u.s. gives more than $1 billion annually to pakistan to help fight terrorism. but there are 180 dispatches here, some offering strong details that pakistan's military intelligence agency, the isi, is helping the afghan insurgency attack american troops. in another one, an official from the cia's counterterrorism center says two religious schools or madrassas near peshawar, pakistan, are providing 95% of suicide attackers. the cia adds this chilling detail -- every month, quote, the former chief of isi, general hamid gul, is visiting one of the madrassas. there is also horrifying detail about civilian deaths in 2007. five ground-launched american rockets destroy a compound where it is believed a senior al qaeda commander is staying. the army delta force arrives to find seven children killed by the rockets and no al qaeda commander. there is a strong warning to anyone reading the secret report not to share the information with anyone outside the united states. saying the rocket strike must be kept protected. and one of the mor
and colleagues all gathering in senator byrd's home state of west virginia. the longest sitting u.s. senator in history. ahead. breaking news is coming in from across the country and around the world for you. >> make no mistake we are headed in the right direction, but as i was reminded on a trip to rac cine wisconsin -- racine wisconsin earlier this week we are not headed there faster,. jon: president obama speaking on new unemployment numbers out. the unemployment rate dropped from 955% from 9.7%. 15 million americans were looking for jobs last month. a whole lot more behind the numbers. jenna lee at the business assignment desk gathering information on what it really means for our job market. >> reporter: let me show you how we got the numbers for the month of june. we lost 125,000 jobs in total. the way that we got to this from the government is overall we lost more than 200,000 government jobs. added jobs in the private sector. if you take the difference you're still down 125,000 jobs. and there is a point to why we actually saw the unemployment rate drop. at first thought you say hey t
-on-one with former president bill clinton. that's tonight at 10:00 eastern. >>> one in every four u.s. citizens now has a risky credit score. if you are one of those people, it could be pretty hard to get a loan for your house or car. we will tell what you you can do about it. progress for new york city cab drivers, like ossman ali is being able to carry people, who aren't carrying cash. meaning more convenience for passengers, and more business for cab drivers. all thanks to the ease and freedom of visa digital currency. now that's progress. visa. currency of progress. >>> wallets are a lot lighter. when the bills don't get paid, your credit suffers. getting a loan becomes absolutely impossible. don't blame this one on the bank. alison kosik joins me live from the new york stock exchange. let's talk about those all-important fico scores and the latest that. that's very important to you and me. >> they definitely are. if you are looking to take out a loerngs directly affects you. i mean, think about this. 25% of people have a score of 599 or below. what i'm talking about are fico scores. lenders us
of june, more than 100 nato troops were killed, the bloodiest month of the war. >>> in iraq, the u.s. has harnded over to the iraqis, the famous face of. tariq aziz, an important member of the inner circle is now in the hands of his own people. iraqi authorities will have to decide how to pursue justice against him. tomorrow the u.s. pulls out of the camp crosser, the last american-run detention facility in iraq. >>> make concern over the cap that was supposed to stop the leaking oil completely. not only have important tests been pushed back, but for now bp has also stopped drilling those relief wells, oil is still gushing freely. the hope was to slowly close the valves. if it's done too quickly it could backfire and the pressure could force leaks somewhere else. some experts say, you could see another oil explosion. mara schiavocampa is in venice, louisiana. why the delays? why are they pushing back things like the valve tests and relief wells? >> reporter: the reason that bp is giving is that they need to conduct further analysis, so they need to collect more information, but it does ra
harris-moore could be on the plane to the u.s. in less than an hour from now. the teenaged fugitive went before a judge only moments ago and pleaded guilty to a minor charge and was facing a slew of charges including weapons possession but he pleaded guilty to entering the bahamas without a passport. peter alexander is following the developments for us from nassau, bahamas, is that it? he now comes to the states to face charges? >> reporter: he can and after he pleaded guilty which was surprising to most of the reporters in the room, he was told by the judge that he had two choices, he could pay $300 or face three months in one of the prisons here in the bahamas. it is a tough spot and certainly something his attorney said is something he doesn't want to do. if they pay $300, the court clerk says he could be taken to a plane and extradited from the country almost immediately. right now we're working to get exact information on where he would be taken. he faces charges in at least eight states for what is said to be more than 100 crimes. when he walked into the courtroom, hs a big guy, he
petraeus the man who wrote the book on counterinsurgency operation is officially taking charge of u.s. and nato forces in afghanistan. tonight the big challenges lie ahead for the new leader of america's longest war and what he had to say about general mcchrystal and why he says failure is not an option. >> this is a contest of will with enemies doing what they can to undermine the confidence of the afghanistan people. >> plus, from the capitol to the white house, from city to towns across the country, america is coming together to mark the birthday of this nation and honor our men and women in uniform, like in washington, dc for the festivities. and a friendship like no other: the story of a great dane and the goat that never leaves its side. >> we can see birds and cats that bond but a goat and a dog is our first. >> we start with the fox urgent from iraq, the u.s. embassy in baghdad under attack today and it happened during vice president's biden surprise visit to the country for independence day weekend. an official says three mortars hit the embassy compound which is located insi
that would involve going through u.s. banks so venezuelan banks are now the vehicle through which iran is able to bypass the embargo. >> sean: one branch of iran's development bank now sits in the venezuelan capital to facilitate the transactions. >> with chavez in the middle he can do their work for them and then handle the money taking commissions at both ends so everybody gains. >> sean: venezuela is also supplying iran with something even more valuable. >> an important reserve of uranium in the north of venezuela about 50,000-tons probably that iran is now able to tap. >> sean: so perhaps it is to coincidence that iran has erected a series of factories in this uranium rich area of venezuela. >> it is troubleing that iran has established some factories, a lot of people estimate that these facilitie factories are r armaments and that the ties, the so-called economic ties between iran and venezuela or perhaps syria and venezuela hide support for terrorism. >> sean: those suspicions are grounded in an event that occurred in november of 2008 when turkey intercepted and iranian ship boun
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